Early Evaluation of a Child’s Communication Development is Critical

The ability to communicate is essential to a person’s life. The development of communication skills develop early in life when we are children. According to the National Institute of Health in an article called Speech and Language Developmental Milestones, “the first 3 years of life, when the brain is developing and maturing, is the most intensive period for acquiring speech and language skills.”

sad child

Early detection of any communication impairment in a child is critical because the ability to communicate is essential to learning. In Frequently Asked Questions: Speech and Language Disorders in the School Setting, the question is asked “How may a speech-language disorder affect school performance?”  The answer is “Children with communication disorders frequently do not perform at grade level. They may struggle with reading, have difficulty understanding and expressing language, misunderstand social cues, avoid attending school, show poor judgment, and have difficulty with tests.”  Deficits and delays in speech and language skills can negatively impact the normal progression of learning skills.

If you suspect your child may have a delay in communication development, an evaluation will provide valuable information. It is never too early to have your child evaluated. For children as young as 12-15 months, an evaluation can ease concerns and provide a base-line for follow-up visits to ensure continued progress.

If therapy is not indicated, parents may be given suggestions to stimulate their child’s speech and language development. At the first visit with Beth Fine, you will be asked to complete a case history of your child’s development and your child will be evaluated. Tests administered will vary depending on your concerns, the child’s performance, and the nature of the disorder.

If you have any questions, contact us at 212-888-3696. 

 

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2 thoughts on “Early Evaluation of a Child’s Communication Development is Critical

  1. Pingback: A Speech-Language Pathologist Should Be Engaged to Diagnose and Treat Developmental Apraxia of Speech | Beth, Fine Communication, P.C. Speech-language Pathologist

  2. Pingback: The Speech Language Pathologist is Key in Improving the Life of a Child with Autism, Asperger | Beth, Fine Communication, P.C. Speech-language Pathologist

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